Bookish Topic Tuesday – Keeping Track of your Reading

Bookish Topic Tuesday

Keeping Track of your Reading

I think keeping track of which books you’ve read and which ones you want to read is pretty important. I mean after all I started this blog, partly to record my thoughts about the books I have been reading, so then I have a record of them. I could have simply signed up to Goodreads and wrote reviews there (or perhaps Amazon – even if Goodreads is now owned by Amazon – or anywhere). Which I guess I did, sort of, since I signed up there in sometime in 2010. It took a while for me to really use it, and progressively track my progress with my currently reading bookshelf, which you can find here. And now I love it! So much so, that next week I want to discuss book statistics. But today I want to discuss Goodreads generally and other book tracking methods.

I posted a while ago about what I was reading when I was 10, and I was only able to really do that in such detail because I was forced to keep reading records in primary (elementary) school. So I have a few detailed records about which books I was reading, when, and what pages I read when. All to keep track of reading so my teachers knew that I was doing what I needed to. This mainly happened in years 5-7, and then even in year 10 I was again forced to do this. And I’m glad I did, because like I said in my previous post, I had forgotten so many of them, and some were really good! The only thing I didn’t really like was that in primary school we were always forced to decorate our ‘reading record’ pages, which was not something I enjoyed. I mean some of them looked pretty good, but, drawing is not one of my skills or passions.

I guess before computers, the only way to record a read book list would be on paper, and now we have all manner of options. Of course Goodreads, and blogging, but are there others out there? I guess a simple word document, or perhaps something on Evernote would suffice as well. Or perhaps you buy every book you read, and put it on a different bookshelf?

I guess a good reason is why bother? The annoying thing with Goodreads is that it takes a while to put in a book, you have to search for it, then you can click on read, then you have the option of giving it a review, then you press save. If you have a list already, transferring that into Goodreads will be a pain. Really it’s best to just start out fresh, and take note of the books you currently read, and then progressively add other books when you get a chance and can feel bothered. That’s what I’ve tended to do, I added quite a few books I remembered I read recently, and even then, my number of read books, 165, is pretty paltry and almost embarrassing (more on that next week). So I’m sure there are quite a few books that I’ve forgotten to add, and will eventually get around to it.

So to really answer the question about why, I guess I like having a record. Our memories aren’t all that great, and as I said, there’s been a number of books I’ve forgotten till I read the title (and then Googled the synopsis). And also I do like statistics which Goodreads can provide. And all the other things Goodreads does, like recommend me books. Plus if I keep a list of books to read, then I might actually get around to them, instead of just completely forgetting they ever exist! And then I can see what else other people are reading, and what they think.

So do you keep a record of the books you’ve read? What method do you use, and why? Ever completely forgotten a book which you adored and then found it again years later?

Advertisements

One thought on “Bookish Topic Tuesday – Keeping Track of your Reading

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s